Garden of Forking Paths

Bourgeois
Topiary by Louise Bourgeois

This Spring, the Met will show an exibit of intentionally unfinished artworks: http://www.metmuseum.org/press/exhibitions/2016/unfinished

The show is a wonderful hommage to artworks that were left unresolved and open-ended, leaving viewers to fill in the meaning and the ending to the story. {click here for Peter Schjeldahl’s upbeat review}

There are many amazing examples of this in literature and music as well.

Bach’s “The Art of Fugue” is a musical piece that lasts for over an hour and ends on mid-note, leaving listeners to hang in the space of the vibrations that the music has created.

And although it does have an ending, Borges’ short story, “The Garden of Forking Paths” begins in the middle of a sentence and ends with the unsettling notion that there could have been many possible endings.

I’m always up for a good story, but I do love art that leaves me perplexed and open to the possibility that there are many interpretations. But the thought does cross my mind that although art and music often leave interpretation up to the viewer, the pleasure of uncertainty somehow doesn’t work as well when it comes to life.

On unstable economic ground? Anxiety!
Not sure about a relationship or job that is in trouble? Insomnia!
Feeling hopeless about a behavior or symptom? Inertia!

Not to mention the hours of despair spent imagining what other people might be thinking about you based on something you said…

The thing is, if you are suffering from emotional blocks, symptoms, or behaviors that are bringing you down…including feelings of inadequacy or purposelessness, chronic pain, or anxiety around almost everything…

…one thing that really helps is to to take the long view by hunkering down into the present. As Borges writes, “century follows century, but things happen only in the present.” And if there is any truth in that, then it’s in the present that you can free yourself from unhappy endings before they actually happen.

A good way to practice this is to look at art not for it’s ability to complete you, but rather for it’s ability to leave you breathing into bewilderment, surrendering into uncertainty, and “thinking out-loud about what you encounter.”

Sound like a weird therapy? Well, I think about myself as a coach for the long view and I help people who are struggling to find direction and a way through their forking paths.

If you’re interested in learning more about me and how I will work with you, click here:

I believe that there are many possible futures. Basically, I’m here to help guide you into the one that will allow you to survive and thrive.

5 thoughts on “Garden of Forking Paths”

  1. Thank you Kristin, Your posting are always cheering, and mean a lot to me. Happy Easter!

    Hugs,

    —Eléna

    >

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